Salt Lake Symphony Guest Artist

Rob Seebacher

Photo of Rob Seebacher - Guest Conductor
Robert J. Seebacher is currently Music Director and Conductor of the Johnson City Symphony Orchestra in Tennessee, Assistant Professor of Music and Director of Instrumental Programs at Centre College, and Assistant Conductor of the National Chorale in New York. Previously, he was Director of Orchestras at the University of South Alabama and Music Director of the Mobile Symphony Youth Orchestra. He has appeared with the Lexington Philharmonic, Youngstown Symphony, Warren Philharmonic, and Mobile Symphony Orchestras. He has held assistant conductor positions with the University of Kentucky Symphony Orchestra and Opera Theatre, Bowling Green Symphony, The Bowling Green Philharmonia, and the Youngstown Symphony Youth Orchestra.

Dr. Seebacher served on the faculty of the Pennsylvania Governor’s School for the Arts until its elimination by the Department of Education. While in residence there, he conducted opera and taught conducting, music theory and history, as well as French horn.  He has conducted numerous All-State and Honors Orchestras in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Alabama. His guest artist collaborations have included those with Chee-Yun, Béla Fleck, Mark O’Connor, Midori, The Canadian Brass, Arlo Guthrie, Lynn Harrell, Bella Hristova, David Ludwig, Joseph Schwantner, Valentina Lisitsa, Billy McLaughlin and the Celtic ensemble, Mithril.

He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Music Education (cum laude) from Youngstown State University, a Master’s Degree in Orchestral Conducting from Bowling Green State University, and a Doctor of Musical Arts Degree in Orchestral Conducting from the University of Kentucky.

Dr. Seebacher has participated in training workshops at The Cleveland Institute of Music and The School of Music, Theatre, and Dance at the University of Michigan. He conducted the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra as part of their inaugural conducting symposium. His teachers include William B. Slocum, Stephen L. Gage, John Nardolillo, Emily Freeman Brown, and Gustav Meier.